Archives for posts with tag: organic

Only granola fills me up! I do not know why but it is true! Unfortunately Jordans, the big family miller, recently put up the sugar content of my beloved Superfood Granola by nearly 3g (now a shocking 19.9g of sugar per 100g of cereal!) I have to resume my search for the perfect granola for breakfast again!

Generally speaking, the choices of granola mix in high street shops are more limited than museli. It is good that I managed to find a few new ones in the market.


Swedish granola with strawberries & blueberries by Swedish Chef
The mix looked beautiful. The dried strawberries and blueberries were big and appetising. I was very excited. It claimed to be healthy with pumpkin seeds, crispy flakes and rice puffs etc. But Continue reading to see if I found the perfect granola >>

Different plants need different nutrients. It is important to use the right fertilisers for the right plants so that they can grow healthily and produce good crops in return.

If you are growing different crops in small quantities, it can be quite costly and troublesome to buy special fertilisers for each crop. If you only want to invest in one good all round fertiliser, I recommend the natural seaweed extract. It is rich in nutrients and can build up a plants’ resistant to stress, pests, diseases and adverse weather conditions. Personally, I use it alternately with other specialised fertilisers but sometimes I just use it on its own when I do not have time.

Seaweed extract generally comes in 2 different forms: liquid and powder. They are used pretty much in the same way, ie. with added water. You add a certain portion of extract to a certain portion of water according to the instructions before pouring into the soil or spraying it onto the plant. Personally I prefer the powder version because it is neater to use.  Continue reading >>

I love it when it rains as it saves me from watering my plants. Though one annoying thing that comes with the rain is slugs and snails- they eat my crops!!!

If I see a slug, I usually use salt to kill it. But it is not an effective way to protect my crops as I have to stand in the garden and wait for the slugs and snails to show up.

The traditional way to kill slugs and snails is to put beer in a jar and use it as a trap. Though I had a friend who mistakenly poured beer into the soil and drew all the slugs and snails to her plot instead. (!)

For a more effective approach, I use Growing Success’s Advanced Slug killer. According to the manufacturer, it is certified for organic use and is safe for using around edible plants, children, animals and wildlife.

I usually scatter the pellets around the crop during late evenings or early mornings when slugs and snails are most active.

The pellets contain ferrous phosphate (iron phosphate – which is an organic compound) and a bait, thus making them attractive to slugs and snails. The slugs and snails are attracted to the bait, ingest the pellets and then crawl away to die, leaving no dead slugs or snails around and no unsightly slime. I like the fact that the uneaten pallets break down rapidly to iron and phosphate which are nutrients to the soil.

The pallets are light blue in colour. If they end up getting onto your crops, you should be able to recognise them easily.

I usually get my pallets from Captial Gardens. £5.21 for 750 gram (treats up to 155 sqm). It is a bargain!