Archives for posts with tag: art review

Takashi MurakamiI have not heard much about Takashi Murakami’s work before, but as I grew up in Hong Kong where Japanese cartoons are shown daily on TV and Japanese manga is pretty much part of people’s life, I am not a stranger to Japanese sexual fantasy, especially how women are usually portrayed as figures that have big breasts, short body and super long legs. Takashi Murakami has ’embraced’ this part of Japanese culture by making two 3 metre high sculptures of what would have been palm size dolls. You can check them out in the Gagosian Gallery, which held an amazing light exhibition of James Turrell earlier this year.

There is also a 2 metre high golden penis standing alongside an equally tall silver vagina. Both have a smiley face on top.


A series of paintings of naked women were on display on one side of the wall. They have been mounted in such a way that your eye level lines up with the level of their genital areas.

Hmmm…. Continue reading >>

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It was the most surreal yet amazing experience I have ever had! This was how I felt after I came out from Bindu Shards– one of the latest pieces of work by the brilliant light artist James Turrell at the Gagosian Gallery in London.

After walking through a dark corridor, I was greeted by a lady in a white laboratory coat, standing under the shadow of a gigantic white metal sphere and its platform. After confirming my identity, I was asked to sign a form to confirm that I do not have epilepsy and nor am I pregnant- it sounded like I was about to experience something dramatic! I was also asked if I would like it ‘soft’ or ‘hard’ as if I was going to have an egg! Apparently it was to do with the intensity of the experience. ‘Since you are confident, I suggest you go for hard’, the lady said. ‘Ok! Hard it is!’ I answered with great anticipation.

After taking my coat and shoes off, I was ‘wheeled’ into the sphere on a ‘bed’- exactly like when I had my MRI scan, including the part when I was given a headphone to wear and a panic button to get out if I felt claustrophobic half way. ‘I need a panic button to see an art installation?’ I thought. The whole build-up was exciting but also a little spooky! Strangely, she suggested that I take off my glasses as I would have a better experience. ‘I do not need my glasses in order to “see” an installation?’ I was intrigued.

Even though I was aware of that fact that technically I was lying down, looking up to  the inside of hemisphere, I felt that I was engulfed by blueness. There was no beginning and no end. The lady was right about no glasses as my vision would have been framed by them unnecessarily. A lot of dark patterns started to emerge first slowly then very quickly in different rhythms. I felt a bit unease and for a split second, I started to worry what if I actually had epilepsy without knowing it? Before I managed to finish this question in my head, I noticed that tears started to drop alongside my face. Continue reading >>

Surround Me is a series of sound installations, which only takes place on Saturdays and Sundays in a few locations in the City of London. It was created by Susan Philipsz (edited: winner of  Turner Prize 2010) and commissioned by Art Angel.

Winky says:
It was strange to walk around the city of London during the weekend. It was deserted. We were left with the streets, architecture and the space created in between. Arriving at Change Alley, I had no idea what to expect. Standing right in the middle of the junctions between four alleys, I was a little confused. Just when I wanted to ‘phone a friend’, a lady started singing ‘New Oyster, new oyster……’ The singing started at the other end as well and the sound was echoed by the surrounding buildings. The ghostly voice subtly unfolded history of the place. It was magical.    Continue reading >>

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By Gerald Chong

What a delightful way to spend a Sunday afternoon in Hyde Park- a bit of a walk, a bit of art and a bit of a treasure hunt!

Equipped with our free guide from the Serpertine Gallery, it did not take long before we spotted our first treasure from a distance.

It was the Sky Mirror 2006! It looked beautifully surreal but it also seemed ‘natural’. I could not stop imagining a bird accidentally flying into it!

Continue reading more about Anish Kapoor >>


joining the lucky few who had the pleasure to wonder over 100 million sunflower seeds.

(by Winky @ Tate modern)

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I went to this exhibition at Selfridges’s Ultralounge to see the gilded erotic door knobs, which Kay Saatchi (one of the curators) said she loves. To be honest, I was quite disappointed. I could not tell how it could ever be used as a door knob- it was just a door decoration. (I sometimes find it hard to ‘switch off’ my practical head when I look at art) I am delighted, however,  to see that the quality of this gilding work is similar to that of mine, which left me dreaming that my gilded peach is actually of exhibition quality.

One lovely find in the exhibition was ‘Aletheia’ by Darren Harvey-Regan. (see photo above) I felt like I was invisible (as I had no reflection), spying on a bird looking into a mirror in a lightly lit room. Despite this, the bird’s eyes reminded me of Mona Lisa’s. They seemed to be able to tracking me down, wherever I moved around! Very clever!


Another interesting piece was the installation by Gavin Webber (photo above). When I walked through the space generated by the super thin mesh, the space changed according to my body movement- defining the space. Basic mechanics + careful choice of material. No fancy electronic sensors. It is simple and subtle. Fantastic!